We thought it’d be cool to share some photography tips here on TAE. We recently got inspired by a photography post we saw featuring the work of Mohamed Hakem, a photographer who recently visited and photographed Siwa in Egypt.

The place is famous for being the country’s largest oasis, and one of the most remote places on earth. Mohamed experimented with lighting from nature, taking photos of the same place in a 24-hour timeframe.

He ended up with his 5 top photos, showing how lighting changes throughout the day and how it affects the subject. Because his photos focused on the same thing, you are easily able to tell the difference. For people who are new to photography, this is an easy way to learn how the time of day affects lighting, which in turn affects how one can take photos more effectively.

In a post on his website and subsequently submitted to Bored Panda, he also explained in detail the photographs he took. Note how even though the photos were pretty much taken from the same point of view, each shot looks so different from each other.

For the first picture, he explained it was when he just arrived. “It was noon and you can see the hard shadows and the high contrast,” he said.

Mohamed-Hakem-02

In his second shot, the magic hour, he said, “I believe was truly magical but opted to capture the sun as it kisses the mountain.”

Mohamed-Hakem-03

Be sure to subscribe now to TAE Magazine, your ultimate source for worldly art inspiration!

Subscribe and to TAE Magazine for FREE

* indicates required



He then said that the “true” magic hour was minutes after sunset. He described it as, “the high clouds now appeared, colored Sky, and light bulbs began appearing on the castle.”

Mohamed-Hakem-04

He also called his midnight shot magical, saying, “stars are so bright as there are barely any pollution, the sky is super dry and the city lights are minor.”

Mohamed-Hakem-05

Lastly he did a sunrise shot, which he thought “would be more interesting.” He felt that the sky that morning looked boring, with the sun shining from behind his point of view. He said the shot “lost a lot of drama.”

Mohamed-Hakem-06
For more info about the artist:

Website: hakemphotography.com

Instagram: @moh_hakem

Facebook: Hakem’s Photography

h/t: Mohamed Kahem’s Photography, Bored Panda

Thanks for reading!